PROJECT

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

Long March––A Walking Visual Display (2002)

Taking its title from the Chinese Red Army’s historical Long March from 1934 to 1936, “Long March—A Walking Visual Display” set out to recreate 20 sites along the 6000-mile historical trek, eventually realizing 12 over the span of 4 months, each composed of site-specific displays and discussions. Each iteration of the project featured: commissioned works created on site by artists from China and beyond; contributions from artists they met throughout the period of preparation, working in the varied strands of contemporary art and folk art; screenings and discussions of historical texts; and seminal conferences on visual culture attended by internationally renowned curators and theorists. The project explored the efficacy of a practice founded on marching in generating ideas and conversations.

The Power of the Public Realm (2003-2004)

Realized in six stages, “The Power of the Public Realm” was a curatorial project dedicated to artistic practices conventionally excluded from Chinese contemporary culture. In its curation, the exhibition attempted to transform this highly exclusive model of cultural production by highlighting a plethora of narratives informed by the artists’ distinctive and often self-taught techniques. By inviting the artists to travel from Yan’an and other rural regions to the exhibition space in Beijing, the exhibition opened up a discursive field between two distinct conditions of cultural production.

The Power of the Public Realm (2003-2004)

Realized in six stages, “The Power of the Public Realm” was a curatorial project dedicated to artistic practices conventionally excluded from Chinese contemporary culture. In its curation, the exhibition attempted to transform this highly exclusive model of cultural production by highlighting a plethora of narratives informed by the artists’ distinctive and often self-taught techniques. By inviting the artists to travel from Yan’an and other rural regions to the exhibition space in Beijing, the exhibition opened up a discursive field between two distinct conditions of cultural production.

The Power of the Public Realm (2003-2004)

Realized in six stages, “The Power of the Public Realm” was a curatorial project dedicated to artistic practices conventionally excluded from Chinese contemporary culture. In its curation, the exhibition attempted to transform this highly exclusive model of cultural production by highlighting a plethora of narratives informed by the artists’ distinctive and often self-taught techniques. By inviting the artists to travel from Yan’an and other rural regions to the exhibition space in Beijing, the exhibition opened up a discursive field between two distinct conditions of cultural production.

The Power of the Public Realm (2003-2004)

Realized in six stages, “The Power of the Public Realm” was a curatorial project dedicated to artistic practices conventionally excluded from Chinese contemporary culture. In its curation, the exhibition attempted to transform this highly exclusive model of cultural production by highlighting a plethora of narratives informed by the artists’ distinctive and often self-taught techniques. By inviting the artists to travel from Yan’an and other rural regions to the exhibition space in Beijing, the exhibition opened up a discursive field between two distinct conditions of cultural production.

The Power of the Public Realm (2003-2004)

Realized in six stages, “The Power of the Public Realm” was a curatorial project dedicated to artistic practices conventionally excluded from Chinese contemporary culture. In its curation, the exhibition attempted to transform this highly exclusive model of cultural production by highlighting a plethora of narratives informed by the artists’ distinctive and often self-taught techniques. By inviting the artists to travel from Yan’an and other rural regions to the exhibition space in Beijing, the exhibition opened up a discursive field between two distinct conditions of cultural production.

Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County (2004)

“Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County” was at once an art project and an experiment in social engineering. By inviting contemporary artists and government officials in the arts and cultural departments “go down to the countryside,” the project launched a county-wide survey of the popularity of the art of paper-cutting. The project culminated in a large-scale exhibition on the current state of folk art, which also provided materials for sociological and anthropological analysis.

Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County (2004)

“Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County” was at once an art project and an experiment in social engineering. By inviting contemporary artists and government officials in the arts and cultural departments “go down to the countryside,” the project launched a county-wide survey of the popularity of the art of paper-cutting. The project culminated in a large-scale exhibition on the current state of folk art, which also provided materials for sociological and anthropological analysis.

Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County (2004)

“Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County” was at once an art project and an experiment in social engineering. By inviting contemporary artists and government officials in the arts and cultural departments “go down to the countryside,” the project launched a county-wide survey of the popularity of the art of paper-cutting. The project culminated in a large-scale exhibition on the current state of folk art, which also provided materials for sociological and anthropological analysis.

Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County (2004)

“Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County” was at once an art project and an experiment in social engineering. By inviting contemporary artists and government officials in the arts and cultural departments “go down to the countryside,” the project launched a county-wide survey of the popularity of the art of paper-cutting. The project culminated in a large-scale exhibition on the current state of folk art, which also provided materials for sociological and anthropological analysis.

Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County (2004)

“Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County” was at once an art project and an experiment in social engineering. By inviting contemporary artists and government officials in the arts and cultural departments “go down to the countryside,” the project launched a county-wide survey of the popularity of the art of paper-cutting. The project culminated in a large-scale exhibition on the current state of folk art, which also provided materials for sociological and anthropological analysis.

Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County (2004)

“Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County” was at once an art project and an experiment in social engineering. By inviting contemporary artists and government officials in the arts and cultural departments “go down to the countryside,” the project launched a county-wide survey of the popularity of the art of paper-cutting. The project culminated in a large-scale exhibition on the current state of folk art, which also provided materials for sociological and anthropological analysis.

Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County (2004)

“Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County” was at once an art project and an experiment in social engineering. By inviting contemporary artists and government officials in the arts and cultural departments “go down to the countryside,” the project launched a county-wide survey of the popularity of the art of paper-cutting. The project culminated in a large-scale exhibition on the current state of folk art, which also provided materials for sociological and anthropological analysis.

Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County (2004)

“Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County” was at once an art project and an experiment in social engineering. By inviting contemporary artists and government officials in the arts and cultural departments “go down to the countryside,” the project launched a county-wide survey of the popularity of the art of paper-cutting. The project culminated in a large-scale exhibition on the current state of folk art, which also provided materials for sociological and anthropological analysis.

Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County (2004)

“Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County” was at once an art project and an experiment in social engineering. By inviting contemporary artists and government officials in the arts and cultural departments “go down to the countryside,” the project launched a county-wide survey of the popularity of the art of paper-cutting. The project culminated in a large-scale exhibition on the current state of folk art, which also provided materials for sociological and anthropological analysis.

Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County (2004)

“Long March Project––The Great Survey of Paper-cutting in Yanchuan County” was at once an art project and an experiment in social engineering. By inviting contemporary artists and government officials in the arts and cultural departments “go down to the countryside,” the project launched a county-wide survey of the popularity of the art of paper-cutting. The project culminated in a large-scale exhibition on the current state of folk art, which also provided materials for sociological and anthropological analysis.

Long March Project––Yan'an (2006-2007)

The terminal of the 6000-mile Long March by the Chinese Red Army, Yan’an is a laboratory for conceiving an ideal society and an archetype of the socialist utopia. It is also the starting point of the new Long March. “Long March Project—Yan’an” examined the effects of globalization on social and cultural development in China through a dialogue between history and the present. The project invited renowned art educators across the country to attend a forum on art education, and led participating artists on a field trip in Yan’an, which resulted in a group exhibition in Beijing of exclusively commissioned works in the end of 2007.

Long March Project––Yan'an (2006-2007)

The terminal of the 6000-mile Long March by the Chinese Red Army, Yan’an is a laboratory for conceiving an ideal society and an archetype of the socialist utopia. It is also the starting point of the new Long March. “Long March Project—Yan’an” examined the effects of globalization on social and cultural development in China through a dialogue between history and the present. The project invited renowned art educators across the country to attend a forum on art education, and led participating artists on a field trip in Yan’an, which resulted in a group exhibition in Beijing of exclusively commissioned works in the end of 2007.

Long March Project––Yan'an (2006-2007)

The terminal of the 6000-mile Long March by the Chinese Red Army, Yan’an is a laboratory for conceiving an ideal society and an archetype of the socialist utopia. It is also the starting point of the new Long March. “Long March Project—Yan’an” examined the effects of globalization on social and cultural development in China through a dialogue between history and the present. The project invited renowned art educators across the country to attend a forum on art education, and led participating artists on a field trip in Yan’an, which resulted in a group exhibition in Beijing of exclusively commissioned works in the end of 2007.

Long March Project––Yan'an (2006-2007)

The terminal of the 6000-mile Long March by the Chinese Red Army, Yan’an is a laboratory for conceiving an ideal society and an archetype of the socialist utopia. It is also the starting point of the new Long March. “Long March Project—Yan’an” examined the effects of globalization on social and cultural development in China through a dialogue between history and the present. The project invited renowned art educators across the country to attend a forum on art education, and led participating artists on a field trip in Yan’an, which resulted in a group exhibition in Beijing of exclusively commissioned works in the end of 2007.

Long March Project - Korea 2018 (2007-)

Korea 2018 initiated in 2005 with its first site carried out in 2007, is an ongoing Long March Project that engages with the future of the Korean Peninsula. Taking the year 2018 as at departure point, the project retraces back to the year 2008 rewriting the future of art history, transforming Korea 2018 from an impossible ideal to a productive reality.

Long March Project - Korea 2018 (2007-)

Korea 2018 initiated in 2005 with its first site carried out in 2007, is an ongoing Long March Project that engages with the future of the Korean Peninsula. Taking the year 2018 as at departure point, the project retraces back to the year 2008 rewriting the future of art history, transforming Korea 2018 from an impossible ideal to a productive reality.

Long March Project - Korea 2018 (2007-)

Korea 2018 initiated in 2005 with its first site carried out in 2007, is an ongoing Long March Project that engages with the future of the Korean Peninsula. Taking the year 2018 as at departure point, the project retraces back to the year 2008 rewriting the future of art history, transforming Korea 2018 from an impossible ideal to a productive reality.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project––Ho Chi Minh Trail (2008-2010)

Realized between 2008 and 2010, “Long March Project—Ho Chi Minh Trail” zoomed in the curatorial focus of Long March Project on a discreet space in history to probe the political economy of visual culture. The geographical and historical complexities of the Ho Chi Minh Trail make it an ideal metaphor for establishing a new network of artistic production among Southeast Asian countries, China, and other communities in the world.

Long March Project - Sheng Project (2015-)

The Sheng Project is a collective curatorial project focused on both the material and immaterial archive of Zheng Shengtian (Sheng). Collected over the course of his personal and institutional practice over six decades in and beyond China, the archive presents to the curatorial team a specific case of intellectual history, one that idiosyncratically navigates pre-socialist, socialist, and post-socialist periods in China.

Long March Project - Sheng Project (2015-)

The Sheng Project is a collective curatorial project focused on both the material and immaterial archive of Zheng Shengtian (Sheng). Collected over the course of his personal and institutional practice over six decades in and beyond China, the archive presents to the curatorial team a specific case of intellectual history, one that idiosyncratically navigates pre-socialist, socialist, and post-socialist periods in China.

Long March Education––Rhizome Forum (2010-2011)

Initiated by the Long March Project in 2010, “Long March Education—Rhizome Forum” invited nearly 30 non-government cultural organizations across China in for a collaborative project to explore the possibilities of building a rhizomic network among various organizations. The project delved into alternative cultural practices and studied their sustainability as well as production model, through the varied methods of site visit, survey, travelling exhibition, lecture, and performance. Among them, the Rhizome Forum Mobile Pavilion travelled to different cities, where it was hosted and presented by different participating organizations in their respective city.

Long March Project at Performa, 2007

In the second edition of Performa, Long March Project collaborated with four of its artists-comrades on the performance-based works that examine ideas of time and place in the trans-national context.

Long March Project––Chinatown (2005-2007)

Continuing with the movement and journey-based research and display method first introduced in “Long MarchA Walking Visual Display” (2003), “Long March ProjectChinatown” was divided into three stages, held respectively in Yokohama (2005), San Francisco (2005) and Oakland (2007). Marching across varied geographies and countries, through disparate histories and cultures, “Chinatown” was an ambitious project fueled by an urge to help the Chinese immigrants write back to their respective local context.

长征计划

LONG MARCH PROJECT